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Don’t Buy a Junk Vehicle or Parts Before Reading This

Junkyard and salvage auto auctions are great sources for finding cheap vehicles, but buyers beware that not all junk vehicles or junk parts can be titled. Even if the vehicle is in perfect condition, if the VIN is found in the NMVTIS database, you will never be able to title that vehicle.

“It’s not a title problem, it’s a VIN problem.”

The National Motor Vehicle Title Information System (NMVTIS) is the federal database that records every vehicle that is ineligible for a title. Once a vehicle’s VIN is registered with the NMVTIS, it is legally considered junk or parts and no title can be issued by any state for the vehicle. To enter the NMVTIS database, a junkyard or similar entity must deem the vehicle as junk and report the VIN to the NMVTIS. In 2010, the U.S. Department of Justice cracked down on underreporting from these entities in a memo stating that these entities are now required to report the VIN of junk vehicles within one month or pay $1,000 per vehicle that is not reported.

Fortunately, every DMV abides by this law and there are no exceptions. This law isn’t designed to prevent individuals from purchasing a vehicle from a junkyard or auto auction, but it is designed to protect buyers from unknowingly purchasing a vehicle with an invalid VIN. If you’ve purchased a vehicle from a junkyard or auto auction such as Copart or IAAI, make sure you perform a VIN check. We recommend checking the VIN of the vehicle prior to purchasing to ensure you have all of the accurate information about your vehicle.  The NMVTIS makes it simple to check your VIN here.

One of the most common calls we get at CarTitles.com is from customers who bought a vehicle from a junkyard that has an NMVTIS history. If you’ve got a junk vehicle or junk parts, or you’re looking to purchase one from an auction, we highly recommend checking the VIN against the NMVTIS database. If your VIN is in this database, there’s only one way to get a vehicle title. To title a junk vehicle, you must obtain a new VIN from the DMV as an assembled vehicle. For more resources and assistance in getting a title for a junk vehicle, check out JunkTitle.com.

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For as little as $159 for most processes, we will save you the headache and prepare all of the car title paperwork needed to get you a new title. Simply choose the title recovery method you’d like to use and we’ll get started!

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Order Vermont Title LoopholeOrder Deceased Owner Title TransferOrder Bonded Title ProcessOrder Abandoned Vehicle ProcessOrder Prior Owner ContactOrder Lien Release Request Letter

Top 5 Tips for Using the Vermont Title Loophole

The Vermont DMV has been a key player in helping drivers across the country get a title for their vehicle in their home state. For many years the Vermont registration process, also known as the Vermont title loophole, has been used to get a title for a vehicle even if the owner resides out of state. No other state offers this type of title method, especially not for out-of-state residents. The Vermont title loophole has two main conditions: the vehicle must be at least 15 years old to qualify and you must have a bill of sale. If your vehicle meets those core conditions, these 5 tips will be your guide to successfully obtaining your title with this method.

Tip #1: Do NOT use the temporary registration method

The Vermont DMV offers a temporary registration method where users can apply online and print out their temporary license plates at home. This is useful for Vermont residents, but will could be detrimental to those who are not. If you use this temporary method, you will be required to submit form VD-119 to the Vermont DMV within 24 hours of registration. Failure to do so in that time frame will result in your original registration being revoked, thus delaying your ability to get permanent registration.

Tip #2: Do NOT put out-of-state license plates on your vehicle

You may have received the license plates, but you should not put them on your vehicle because they will likely not be valid in your state. All states have statutes that require new residents to transfer their vehicle registration and driver’s license to their current state within a specific time frame. If you’re using this title method, you’ve probably lived in your state for longer than the specified time so putting out-of-state plates on your vehicle would likely be illegal in your state and you may be ticketed or fined. 

We are not lawyers and we are not giving legal advice, always check with your state laws to verify before proceeding. 

Tip #3: Type your title application

With today’s technology, the DMV is no longer manually sifting through all of the documents they receive. Most DMV’s have some sort of automated system that reads the information on a document and loads it into their system. Typing your title application can allow for quicker processing times, while handwritten applications often are illegible for some systems and may result in longer, manual processing.

Tip #4: Present your DMV with this VT Bulletin 

Many states are familiar with the Vermont title loophole, but it’s important to be prepared in the event your DMV is not. The Title Informational Bulletin from the state of Vermont describes how the process works and states that the documentation you’re providing represents their state’s version of a title. It states that vehicles more than 15 years old cannot receive a title but can be registered and that registration is equivalent to a certificate of ownership in the state of Vermont. 

Tip #5: Choose the best book value for your vehicle

The book value of your vehicle is how much your vehicle is worth on the market today. To check the book value of your vehicle, we recommend using the NADA value. The Vermont registration process uses the book value of the vehicle to calculate the amount of taxes owed. We recommend thoroughly reading through the options and making sure you’re selecting the correct vehicle and price. If your calculation is under, the Vermont DMV will send you a revised invoice for adjustments. However, if you overpaid, that money will not be refunded.

Here’s a secret: If you transfer your registration immediately, there may be a way to get a refund from some of your Vermont fees.

The Vermont title loophole is just that: a loophole. A loophole that allows vehicle owners to get a title for their vehicle without spending countless hours communicating with the DMV. This method has been used for many years by vehicle owners across the country and has been mentioned by a variety of automotive industry experts such as Jalopnik and Hagerty. Get started with us here and let us professionally prepare your forms for success using the Vermont title loophole.

Want a CarTitles.com professional to do it for you?

For as little as $159 for most processes, we will save you the headache and prepare all of the car title paperwork needed to get you a new title. Simply choose the title recovery method you’d like to use and we’ll get started!

Select your title recovery method:

Order Vermont Title LoopholeOrder Deceased Owner Title TransferOrder Bonded Title ProcessOrder Abandoned Vehicle ProcessOrder Prior Owner ContactOrder Lien Release Request Letter

How To Get a Duplicate Car Title

Was your car title lost or stolen? If so, you may need to obtain a duplicate title to prove ownership of your vehicle. A duplicate title is a document that’s needed when the original title is lost, stolen, damaged, or mutilated. It’s imperative that your vehicle is titled in your name because if your name isn’t on the vehicle title, you don’t own it.

Applying for a duplicate or replacement title

The first step to applying for a duplicate title is determining who was that last titled owner. If it’s your name, you can apply for a duplicate title. If your name was not on the original vehicle title, you will not be able to obtain a duplicate title.

Each of the 50 states will have its own set of fees for duplicate title processes. If you are applying by mail, it’s important to check your state fees prior to submitting your paperwork. Most state DMVs accept checks and money orders, do not mail cash. Many states offer this process for a very small fee, for example, in Minnesota the duplicate title fee is  $7.25, while in Texas the duplicate title fee is a mere $2.00. 

Once you’ve located your DMV and have your funds, you can prepare your application for duplicate or replacement title. Many states, such as Colorado, require that your duplicate or replacement title application be notarized prior to submission, be sure to check with your state regulations prior to submitting your application. 

If you’ve recently moved to a new state and need to get a duplicate title, you will need to apply for a duplicate title in the state where the vehicle was last titled. For example, if your vehicle was last titled in Florida but you now live in Georgia, you cannot get a duplicate title from the Georgia DMV. Similarly, if your vehicle title shows a lien, you will first need to get your lien released before you are able to apply for a title.

If you’re the legal owner of a vehicle and simply need to get your lost title replaced, the duplicate title process is likely for you. Be sure to check your state’s fees and document requirements prior to submitting your application to get a title. Click here for more information on this title process and how CarTitles.com can professionally prepare your title documents.

9 Components of a Bill of Sale

One of the most important documents in vehicle ownership is often the one most overlooked. This significant document has many names: sales receipt, proof of purchase, statement, but most people will recognize this document to be the bill of sale. A bill of sale is a record of the transaction of a vehicle. This document proves that you actually purchased the vehicle from the seller or dealership. By itself, simply providing this document will not get you a title. However, it’s often the first step in transferring your title.

How to write a bill of sale:

  1. Date of purchase
  2. Name of the seller
  3. Name of the buyer
  4. The seller’s signature
  5. Vehicle identification number (VIN)
  6. Vehicle make
  7. Vehicle model
  8. Model year
  9. Odometer statement

A bill of sale can be handwritten or typed. Some states require your bill of sale to be notarized before they accept it as proof of ownership. Be sure to check the requirements of your state DMV before submitting your documents. When written correctly, a bill of sale can be the first step in getting your vehicle title. If written incorrectly, the process to transfer your vehicle title will be difficult and could get you into trouble with the DMV. 

Are you ready to transfer your title? If your vehicle is 15 years old or older, you may qualify for an out-of-state title transfer using the Vermont loophole. This title method is available for non-residents of Vermont and doesn’t require to you travel out of state. Get started with us here and let us professionally prepare your title documents.

PGlmcmFtZSBzcmM9Imh0dHBzOi8vYXBwLmFjdWl0eXNjaGVkdWxpbmcuY29tL3NjaGVkdWxlLnBocD9vd25lcj0xOTQ4ODEyNiZhcHBvaW50bWVudFR5cGU9MjMwNjY0MTAiIHRpdGxlPSJTY2hlZHVsZSBBcHBvaW50bWVudCIgd2lkdGg9IjEwMCUiIGhlaWdodD0iODAwIiBmcmFtZUJvcmRlcj0iMCI+PC9pZnJhbWU+PHNjcmlwdCBzcmM9Imh0dHBzOi8vZW1iZWQuYWN1aXR5c2NoZWR1bGluZy5jb20vanMvZW1iZWQuanMiIHR5cGU9InRleHQvamF2YXNjcmlwdCI+PC9zY3JpcHQ+

Want a CarTitles.com professional to do it for you?

For as little as $159 for most processes, we will save you the headache and prepare all of the car title paperwork needed to get you a new title. Simply choose the title recovery method you’d like to use and we’ll get started!

Select your title recovery method:

Order Vermont Title LoopholeOrder Deceased Owner Title TransferOrder Bonded Title ProcessOrder Abandoned Vehicle ProcessOrder Prior Owner ContactOrder Lien Release Request Letter

Vehicle Lien Release: What You Need to Know

If you’re wondering if it’s really necessary to remove your vehicle title lien, the answer is yes. Even if you’ve already paid off your loan balance, your vehicle title will still show a lien until you’ve released the lien from the lienholder. Without a vehicle lien release, the DMV in your state will prohibit you from selling or transferring your vehicle until all liens are cleared from the title. 

Removing a vehicle title lien can be tricky. In most cases, there are three general steps to release a title lien:

Step 1: Identify the lienholder

Step 2: Complete a lien release letter

Step 3: Send your lien release letter to the lienholder

Identify the Lienholder

Identifying your lienholder may be the easy part, but unfortunately, not all lienholders will still be in business. If your lienholder is no longer in business, you may have to do conduct research to locate the current registered agent authorized to release the lien. After identifying your lienholder, look for at least three addresses: principal address, mailing address, and registered agent address. 

Most lenders don’t have a lien release department standing by ready to release your lien. It’s important to identify all of the possible addresses of your lienholder to ensure the right party will receive your paperwork.

Complete a Lien Release Letter

After identifying your lienholder, you’ll need to complete a request for a lien release letter or non-interest letter to the lienholder agent. In most states, this form needs to be notarized by a certified public notary. Most lenders will have a public notary on staff, but it’s important to check with your lender prior to sending your request for lien release. This form must be sent to the lienholder by certified mail and cannot be sent electronically or requested via phone. 

In this letter, you must certify that the lien against the vehicle has been satisfied and provide the following information: VIN, year, make, model, owner name, and lienholder information. If you submit a request for lien release with missing information, your request for lien release will not be approved.

Sending your Request for Lien Release

Once you’ve identified your lienholder and have the proper documents completed and notarized, you’re ready to send off your request for lien release for your lienholder’s signature. Compile all of your documents and send them to at least three addresses via certified mail. Your lienholder will review your documents, ensure that the balance has been paid, then will release the lien or contact you if the proper documentation is missing. 

The best practice for vehicle lien releases is to complete the paperwork for your lienholder. If you send incomplete documents, you won’t get your lien release or it could take months to get resolved. Need assistance with your vehicle lien release documents? Order your professionally prepared vehicle lien release documents here.

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